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HPE Cray EX ranked among the fastest computers in the world

 


The new HPE Cray EX in Cheyenne, Wyoming, is supposed to be ranked among the fastest in the world.

The supercomputer helps study phenomena, including climate change, severe weather, forest fires, and solar storms that could threaten GPS.

Hewlett Packard Enterprise won the tender to offer the $35 million to $40 million supercomputing center in Cheyenne, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) announced.

The system is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Wyoming Center for Supercomputing of the National Center for Atmospheric Research NWSC is funded by the National Science Foundation and the state of Wyoming through accreditation at the University of Wyoming.

According to the information, the HPE Cray EX will be a 19.87 petaflop system, which means that it is theoretically capable of performing approximately 20 quadrillion calculations per second.

This means that the new giant computer is 3.5 times faster than the current device at the Wyoming Supercomputing Center called Cheyenne.

The maximum speed of the new machine per second will be roughly equivalent to every man, woman, and child on the planet that solves one equation every second for a month.

This computational force can perform some of the most complex simulations to date of large-scale natural events affected by man.

According to the National Center for Atmospheric Research, the giant computer is supposed to be ranked among the world's 25 fastest gigabyte computers after it is installed this year and will be operational in early 2022.

"The computer supports basic research in ways that lead to more detailed and useful predictions of the world around us, helping to make our society more resilient in the face of increasingly costly disasters and contributing to improving human health and well-being," said Everette Joseph, director of the Center, in a press release.

More than 4,000 people from hundreds of universities and other institutions around the world have used the Wyoming Supercomputing Center of the National Center for Atmospheric Research since it opened in 2012.

The facility's current giant computer, Cheyenne, is three times faster than its predecessor, Yellowstone.

The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) is holding a statewide competition for schoolchildren in Wyoming to propose a name for the new system.

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